Class act: Math teacher Alice Fogler

In our series “Class Act,” we introduce new teachers and their backgrounds in and outside the classroom. Read archives from the series here.

Under the guidance of math teacher Dwight Raulston (’71), Alice Fogler got her first glimpse of teaching when she was a high school senior. Little did she know, she would return in six years to work alongside those who inspired her.  

During her senior year, Fogler (‘10) took differential equations and multivariable calculus with Raulston. For each class, Raulston offers two independent study project options: students can either teach a class for a lower math course, or explore advanced math typically seen late in college. Fogler chose to teach Nicole Vlasek’s 7th grade math class, and “absolutely loved it.”

“She was very responsible and always got her work done,” Raulston said. “I thought at the time that she’d be a good teacher.”

I thought at the time that she’d be a good teacher.”

Fogler then attended Washington University in St. Louis, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in mathematics and minored in dance. Fogler still studies ballet and has recently picked up yoga.

After graduating from WashU, Fogler returned to Houston. She taught Algebra I and geometry at Westchester Academy for International Studies, Spring Branch ISD, before coming to St. John’s.

Fogler currently teaches Advanced Algebra II and Euclidian Geometry, and students say her love of math is evident. Besides teaching math, Fogler helps coach debate and is the assistant director of the upcoming musical.

“She has a genuine passion for math.” sophomore Jonah Pesikoff said. “She encourages a very fun yet challenging environment in the classroom.”

Returning to St. John’s was like coming home. It really is home to me.”

After six years, the biggest change for Fogler is teaching alongside her former teachers.

“They’ve all been very welcoming, which makes it easier to transition from being their student to being their colleague,” Fogler said.

Since Fogler’s graduation, St. John’s has acquired the Taub property and added Flores Hall, a stark difference from the aging Winston Hall.

“A lot has changed physically. The cafeteria was never a place where people hung out,” Fogler said. “You just went there when you had to eat lunch. Now it’s much more of a student center than a cafeteria. It has a college vibe to it.”

Despite these changes, Fogler has not lost the comfortable feel of her high school.

“Returning to St. John’s was like coming home,” Fogler said. “It really is home for me.”

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